The US Ebola case: 5 things to know

FILE - This undated file image made available by the CDC shows the Ebola Virus. (AP Photo/CDC, File)Health officials on Tuesday announced the first case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States — a man isolated in intensive care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.



McAfee names Kimmel its 'most dangerous celebrity'

FILE - In this March 20, 2014, file photo, television personality and event host Jimmy Kimmel attends the 2nd Annual "Rebels With a Cause" Gala benefiting the USC Center for Applied Molecular Medicine at Paramount Pictures Studios in Los Angeles. Computer security software firm McAfee says the talk-show host is the most dangerous celebrity to search for online. The company said Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, that a search for Kimmel carries a 19 percent chance of landing on a website that has tested positive for spyware, viruses or malware. (Photo by Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP, File)LOS ANGELES (AP) — If you're about to Google Jimmy Kimmel, beware.



Government confirms first case of Ebola in US

Director of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dr. Tom Frieden speaks during a news conference after confirming that a patient at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for Ebola, the first case of the disease to be diagnosed in the United States, announced Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, in Atlanta. The person, an adult who was not publicly identified, developed symptoms days after returning to Texas from Liberia and showed no symptoms on the plane, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)DALLAS (AP) — The first case of Ebola diagnosed in the U.S. was confirmed Tuesday in a patient who recently traveled from Liberia to Dallas — a sign of the far-reaching impact of the out-of-control epidemic in West Africa.



Afghan official says 2 suicide bomber attacks in Kabul kill 7, wound 21 people, mostly troops

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghan official says 2 suicide bomber attacks in Kabul kill 7, wound 21 people, mostly troops.
U.S. orders airlines to replace cockpit displays on 1,300 Boeing airplanes

The Boeing logo is seen at their headquarters in Chicago(Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is requiring airlines to replace cockpit displays on more than 1,300 Boeing Co airplanes to avoid interference from Wi-Fi and cellular devices. Airlines will need to replace certain cockpit display units made by Honeywell International Inc used on Boeing's 737 and 777 jets within five years, according to an FAA document. (http://bit.ly/1qTpOYb) The FAA said the display units were susceptible to interference from Wi-Fi frequencies. ...





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